Issues

Beyond Article





Questioning the basis of our work:
Christianity, children’s rights and development


Second printing 2006
Co-publication with Tearfund
Compiled and edited by Judith Ennew and
Paul Stephenson

Contributors Jane Adolphe, Rachel Baker, Ros Besford, Jo de Berry, Siobhan Calthrop, Helen Foakes, Ben Hayhow, Charlie Hoare, Dewi Hughes, Gill Kanga, Gudrun Lang, Virginia Morrow, Helen Ryman, Anita Schrader, Andrew Tomkins, Simon Vincent and Keith White

Paperback 79 pages with glossary and reading list
ISBN 974-92005-4-3


What do children’s rights mean to Christian organizations in the development field? Does the idea of children’s rights contradict Biblical principles about family life? Should Christians use human rights in their work with children and communities. Doesn’t the Bible already provide a sufficient basis?

Based on a workshop held in the University of Cambridge in 2003, this book does not claim to have found all the answers, but contributes to a growing literature on the relationships between children’s rights, the theology of childhood and practical work with children, families and communities. The book consists of chapters from four disciplinary perspectives – law, theology, community development and child development, prefaced by a chapter on the background to human and children’s rights. The text is organized as a series of points and counterpoints designed to stimulate the reader’s reflections and provoke discussion in a debate that has only just begun.

An important book for anyone working with children in a Christian context, or within a faith-based organization.


Price US$10, including postage and packaging worldwide.

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Beyond Article


Childrearing for peace: A search for solutions family life without corporal punishment in East Asia and the Pacific

2005
Judith Ennew and Dominique Pierre Plateau

Paperback 79 pages with glossary and reading list
ISBN 974-92005-4-3

Are human beings really just aggressive apes? Is the human race inherently violent? Can we achieve nothing more than control over brutal instincts? In contrast to media and popular science, the authors of this book suggest that the solution to violence against children in families rests in promoting and practicing non violence, rather than in policing violent conflict.


They deny that aggression is a fundamental human trait and that violent actions (such as war) in pursuit of personal and group goals are inevitable. This is explored through examining the ethnographic record of childrearing of ‘peaceful peoples’ of East Asia and the Pacific, which indicates that the human energies sometimes called ‘aggression’ can be used to develop self control and respect for others, rather than being devoted to controlling other people for selfish purposes.

Childrearing for peace: A search for solutions  is the outcome of a collaboration between the Centre for Family Research, University of Cambridge, and Save the Children Sweden Southeast Asia and Pacific. It was originally a regional submission to the United Nations Secretary General’s Global Study on Violence Against Children, 2006. The book will be of interest to anyone working with children, especially within the worldwide peace movement.

Price US$10, including postage and packaging worldwide.

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